Farewell tae the Ferries

On Springthyme SPRCD 1002
John Watt & Davey Stewart - Shores of the Forth

The opening of the Forth Foad Bridge in September 1964, linking Fife with the Lothians saw the demise of the ferry service across the river Forth between North and South Queensferry. John’s composition takes a wry look at some of the problems and frustrations of travel by ferry. Auld Reekie – Edinburgh. The fare for a pedestrian was 8d, for a coffin and corpse 12/6d. Queen Margaret travelled across the forth in 1068 to marry Malcolm Canmore, King of Scots at Dunfermline, the ancient capital of Scotland.

Noo the wide river Forth oh it keeps us apart,
Frae the hustle and bustle o Auld Reekie’s clime;
While the motorist glowers as he sits here for hours,
It’s farewell tae the ferries and no afore time.

There’s a wheen o guid siller been made on the ferries,
They rob ye that much, by Jove it’s a crime;
Oh eightpence ye need – twelve and six if ye’re deid,
It’s farewell tae the ferries and no afore time.

Aft times have I laughed at the heid o the queue,
At these other poor devils a half mile behind;
For wherever they’re goin they’d be far quicker rowin,
Farewell tae the ferries and no afore time.

Noo Queen Margaret she crossed wi her ladies in waiting,
We’re still waitin noo, foul weather and fine;
In an hour they rowed – noo we’re slower by Jove,
It’s farewell tae the ferries and no afore time.

So here’s tae the brig, that’s crossin the Forth,
All the tolls paid wi scarcely a whine;
For its South o the border free traivel’s the order,
Farewell tae the ferries and no afore time,
Farewell tae the ferries and no afore time.


Springthyme SPRCD 1002
© 1976, 2010 Springthyme Records
www.springthyme.co.uk